Feb 23, 2020  
2018-2019 Catalogue 
    
2018-2019 Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Numbering

The College of Wooster uses a five-digit course numbering system. The first three digits indicate the primary course number. The next two digits are the secondary course number and indicate whether there is a special focus for the course. For example:

The first letters are the department or program abbreviation. The next three digits are the primary course number (101 is the primary course number for all Introduction to Historial Study courses). The last two digits are the secondary course number. These two digits indicate that the special focus for this HIST 101 course is The History of Islam. A course with a given three-digit primary course number can only be taken once for credit unless specifically indicated otherwise by the department.

The following policy has been used in assigning primary course numbers:

  • 100-level courses are usually introductory courses; some 100-level courses do have prerequisites, and students are advised to consult the description for each course.
  • 200-level courses are usually beyond the introductory level, although many 200-level courses are open to first-year students and to majors and non-majors.
  • 300-level courses are seminars and courses primarily for majors but open to other students with the consent of the instructor.
  • The following numbers are for Independent Study: I.S. 40100 (Junior Independent Study), I.S. 45100 and I.S. 45200 (Senior Independent Study).

In addition to the regular course offerings, many departments offer individual tutorials under the number 40000 and internships under 41000. On occasion, departments will offer a course on a special topic as approved by the Educational Policy Committee, designated 19900, 29900, or 39900.

Abbreviation

In keeping with the general education requirements of the College’s curriculum
(see Degree Requirements ), course listings employ the following abbreviations:

W Writing Intensive 

C Studies in Cultural Difference

R Religious Perspectives

Q Quantitative Reasoning

AH Learning Across the Disciplines: Arts and Humanities

HSS Learning Across the Disciplines: History and Social Sciences 

MNS Learning Across the Disciplines: Mathematical and Natural Sciences

Except where otherwise noted, all courses carry one course credit.

 

Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

  
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    WGSS 12000 - Intro to Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies

    Course Credit: 1
    INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES This course is an overview of WGSS as a discipline and an interdisciplinary field of inquiry, introducing the many issues, theories, and feminist approaches that constitute it. We will examine how gender intersects with nation, religion, race, class and sexuality in order to produce systematic structures of power. Course materials include theoretical, analytical and creative texts. Students will gain the critical tools to analyze a range of historical, political, social and cultural issues from a WGSS perspective, across local and global contexts. Annually. Fall and Spring. [AH, HSS]
  
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    WGSS 20200 - Histories of Feminist Thought

    Course Credit: 1
    HISTORIES OF FEMINIST THOUGHT This course is a broad introduction to the histories of feminist thought, including major influences in Indigenous and women of color (WoC) feminist thought, as well as Euro-American feminist thought with its roots in early modern Europe, the women’s suffrage movement (often characterized as the First Wave) through the Second and Third Waves of the women’s movement and beyond. This course rejects a singular Eurocentric, Global North history of feminism in favor of addressing the intersections and controversies that have emerged among Euro-American feminists, WoC and postcolonial feminist critiques, and within queer studies and queer theory. Prerequisite(s): WGSS 12000; or permission of instructor. [AH, HSS]
  
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    WGSS 20400 - Transnational Feminisms

    Course Credit: 1
    (LAST, RELS)
    TRANSNATIONAL FEMINISMS This course explores how feminism is understood throughout the world and examines struggles for women’s equality in both a historical and transnational perspective. It examines the relationship between feminisms in the Global North and the Global South, especially as efforts to empower women are impacted by nationalism, race, class and caste, religion, sexuality, and immigration. It also interrogates the complex process of globalization to understand why it is experienced differently based on gender as well as geographical location. Theoretical developments in transnational feminist and postcolonial theory and case studies of transnational feminist activism allow students to critically explore political movements to address intersecting inequities throughout the world. Prerequisite(s): WGSS 12000 [C, HSS]
  
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    WGSS 20600 - Queer Lives

    Course Credit: 1
    QUEER LIVES This course addresses a broad range of queer issues and the lived experiences of sexual minorities throughout the world. It explores major events in the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, and queer political movements in the United States and transnationally to understand the social construction of identities and movements and how they have changed in different times and places–often as a result of race-, class-, and gender-based inequities. The course also considers the categories used to describe same-sex desire. How do the Western terms used above help (or hinder) our understandings of the experiences of Indian hijras, Thai Toms & Dees, Native American two-spirit people, drag queens and kings, and others who do not fit neatly within single categories of gender, sex, and sexuality? Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000 Spring. [C, HSS]
  
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    WGSS 29900 - Special Topics in Wgss

    Course Credit: 1
    Special Topics in WGSS
  
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    WGSS 29901 - Race, Gender and Popular Music

    Course Credit: 1
    Race, Gender and Popular Music This course provides the history of popular music since the 1970s, focusing primarily on the concepts of race, gender and to a lesser degree sexuality, to understand the emergence of sound cultures from the US, Caribbean, and Western Europe. We will begin the course by studying Funk, Soul, and R&B of the 1970s; the mixing techniques and sound system culture developed in Reggae (dub), and Disco. We will also discuss various aspects Hip-Hop culture, especially the DJ techniques of scratching and sampling to explore how Hip-Hop has shaped popular music since the 1970s. We will ask, for example: how has popular music functioned as one of the main channels of communication among the cultures of the Black/African diaspora? Overall, this course investigates the aesthetic, political, cultural, and economic dimensions of popular music, paying particular attention to questions of gender, sexuality, class, nation, language, and technology. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000
  
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    WGSS 33000 - Doing Feminist Research: Theory & Practi

    Course Credit: 1
    DOING FEMINIST RESEARCH: THEORY & PRACTICE This course addresses the question of what makes a research methodology feminist. Through advanced interdisciplinary readings and short writing assignments, students are introduced to feminist research methods as well as distinctive feminist critical approaches to issues in the social sciences, natural sciences, and the humanities. This course is the equivalent of WGSS 401 and is required of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies majors and minors, but it is designed for other students planning to incorporate feminist perspectives into their senior research. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000 and 1 200-level WGSS course; or permission of instructor. Annually. Spring.
  
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    WGSS 35000 - Sr. Seminar:Feminist Pedagogy in Action

    Course Credit: 1
    SENIOR SEMINAR: FEMINIST PEDAGOGY IN ACTION This course is a rethinking of students’ previous work in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies through an in-depth immersion in advanced theoretical readings, literature, and personal writings pertaining to women, gender, and sexuality. The course is taught through feminist pedagogy and collaborative learning. The seminar is required of majors and minors but open to other interested students. S/NC. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000, WGSS-33000, and 1 200-level WGSS course; or permission of instructor Annually. Fall.
  
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    WGSS 39900 - Special Topics in WGSS

    Course Credit: 0.25
    Maximum Credit: 1
    SPECIAL TOPICS IN WGSS. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000; or permission of instructor
  
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    WGSS 39901 - Musc Cult @ the Int Gndr Race & Sxuality

    Course Credit: 1
    MUSIC, CULTURE & THE INTERNATIONAL RACE AND SEXUALITY This course is an advanced seminar exploring current theory and research on selected interdisciplinary issues in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Topics will be announced in advance by the chair of the WGSS Program and the faculty member teaching the course. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000
  
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    WGSS 40000 - Tutorial

    Course Credit: 1
    TUTORIAL IN WGSS This course is independent research on a topic in consultation with a supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: WGSS 12000 and at least one other course from Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies courses or cross-listings; the approval of both the supervising faculty member and the chairperson is required prior to registration. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000, and at least one other WGSS course or cross-listed course in WGSS
  
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    WGSS 40500 - WGSS Practicum

    Course Credit: 1
    WGSS PRACTICUM This course involves mentored participation in a student-defined project in feminist praxis. The student will engage in practical efforts toward understanding and/or working for gender justice, and the course will culminate in written analysis of the practicum experience in relation to coursework in WGSS. Practicum could include: organizing events on campus around feminist issues, publishing a feminist newsletter, or staging a theatre production, in conjunction with academic work on the topic. Students interested in a practicum experience are also urged to explore the Antioch Women’s Students Semester in Europe (Fall), the GLCA Philadelphia Center Urban Program, and make prior arrangements with a Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty member to count their off-campus work as a practicum upon submission of a reflective paper or journal entries. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000 and at least 1 other WGSS course; Permission of the Chairperson is required before registration. Annually. Fall and Spring.
  
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    WGSS 41000 - WGSS Internship

    Course Credit: 0.25
    WGSS INTERNSHIP A structured, usually off-campus experience, in which a student extends classroom knowledge to a work position within a community, business, or government organization. Student interns work and learn under the joint guidance of a host organization supervisor and a College of Wooster mentor. The student must arrange the internship in advance and develop an Internship Learning Plan (forms available through the Registrar) in consultation with a WGSS-affiliated faculty member. May be repeated. S/NC. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-12000 and at least 1 other WGSS course; Permission of the mentor, department chair, faculty advisor, and the Associate Dean for Experiential Learning is required. Annually. Fall and Spring.
  
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    WGSS 45100 - Independent Study

    Course Credit: 1
    SENIOR INDEPENDENT STUDY–SEMESTER ONE The first semester of the Senior Independent Study project, in which students use the methods and perspectives of feminist interdisciplinary scholarship to pursue questions of their own design, developed within the context of their prior course work and their interests within the major, and which culminates in a thesis and an oral examination in the second semester. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-33000 Annually. Fall and Spring.
  
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    WGSS 45200 - Independent Study

    Course Credit: 1
    SENIOR INDEPENDENT STUDY–SEMESTER TWO The second semester of the Senior Independent Study project, which culminates in the thesis and an oral examination. Prerequisite(s): WGSS-45100