Oct 22, 2019  
2018-2019 Catalogue 
    
2018-2019 Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Numbering

The College of Wooster uses a five-digit course numbering system. The first three digits indicate the primary course number. The next two digits are the secondary course number and indicate whether there is a special focus for the course. For example:

The first letters are the department or program abbreviation. The next three digits are the primary course number (101 is the primary course number for all Introduction to Historial Study courses). The last two digits are the secondary course number. These two digits indicate that the special focus for this HIST 101 course is The History of Islam. A course with a given three-digit primary course number can only be taken once for credit unless specifically indicated otherwise by the department.

The following policy has been used in assigning primary course numbers:

  • 100-level courses are usually introductory courses; some 100-level courses do have prerequisites, and students are advised to consult the description for each course.
  • 200-level courses are usually beyond the introductory level, although many 200-level courses are open to first-year students and to majors and non-majors.
  • 300-level courses are seminars and courses primarily for majors but open to other students with the consent of the instructor.
  • The following numbers are for Independent Study: I.S. 40100 (Junior Independent Study), I.S. 45100 and I.S. 45200 (Senior Independent Study).

In addition to the regular course offerings, many departments offer individual tutorials under the number 40000 and internships under 41000. On occasion, departments will offer a course on a special topic as approved by the Educational Policy Committee, designated 19900, 29900, or 39900.

Abbreviation

In keeping with the general education requirements of the College’s curriculum
(see Degree Requirements ), course listings employ the following abbreviations:

W Writing Intensive 

C Studies in Cultural Difference

R Religious Perspectives

Q Quantitative Reasoning

AH Learning Across the Disciplines: Arts and Humanities

HSS Learning Across the Disciplines: History and Social Sciences 

MNS Learning Across the Disciplines: Mathematical and Natural Sciences

Except where otherwise noted, all courses carry one course credit.

 

Earth Sciences

  
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    ESCI 10000 - History of Life

    Course Credit: 1
    (ARCH)
    History of Life Life has a long and fascinating history recorded in rocks, fossils and living organisms themselves. This course covers the history of life and Earth from the beginning of the Universe through the appearance of our own species. Evolution is the primary theme, with particular emphasis on the complex relationships between the development of life and its physical environments. Three hours of lecture weekly. Annually. Fall and Spring. [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 10500 - Geology of Natural Hazards

    Course Credit: 1
    (ARCH, ENVS)
    Geology of Natural Hazards Survey of the causes, human and environmental effects, and mitigation of natural hazards and disasters. Emphasis on the interactions between geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric processes that impact humans and the environment in catastrophic ways. Topics include earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding, landslides, severe weather, and destructive coastal processes. Three hours of lecture weekly. Annually. Spring. [MNS]
  
  •  

    ESCI 11000 - Environmental Geology

    Course Credit: 1
    (ENVS)
    Environmental Geology An investigation of how human activities affect and are affected by physical Earth processes. Topics include an overview of Earth’s development; minerals and rocks; internal processes such as plate tectonics, earthquakes, and volcanoes; surface processes; natural resources; waste disposal; pollution and related topics. Three hours of lecture weekly. Fieldtrips. Annually. Fall and Spring. [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 11500 - Oceanography

    Course Credit: 1
    Oceanography An interdisciplinary environmental science course that examines the oceans, with emphasis on physical oceanography. Physical topics will include the formation of ocean basins and bathymetric features, ocean sediments, seawater chemistry, wind- and density-driven circulation, waves, tides, and coastal processes. The course will also include discussions of large-scale ocean biology, as well as an exploration of ocean resources and human interactions with the oceans. Three hours of lecture weekly. Annually. Spring. [MNS]
  
  •  

    ESCI 12000 - Geology of National Parks

    Course Credit: 1
    (ARCH, ENVS)
    Geology of Our National Parks Examination of the fundamental geologic processes responsible for the unique landscapes of the U.S. National Parks. Topics include plate tectonics; geologic time; Earth materials; mountain building; volcanism; climate change; and surficial and subsurface landscape evolution through glacial, stream, and groundwater activity. An overview of the geologic histories of selected National Parks will be emphasized. Three hours of lecture weekly. Annually. Fall and Spring. [MNS]
  
  •  

    ESCI 19900 - Special Topics

    Course Credit: 0.5
    Maximum Credit: 1
    Special Topics
  
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    ESCI 19901 - GIS Basic

    Course Credit: 0.5
    GIS Basics This half-credit, hands-on course is designed to introduce students from all backgrounds to the concepts that underpin Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students who complete this course will learn the basics of effectively using and displaying geographic data in both raster and vector formats. Topics covered will include importing and formatting geographic data, managing data projections, utlizing online data sources and GIS tools, and using fundamental cartographic concepts to create effective maps. Students who complete this course will be prepared for deeper exploration of GIS in ESCI 25000 (Introduction to Geographic Inforamtion Systems).
  
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    ESCI 20000 - Earth Systems

    Course Credit: 1.25
    (ARCH)
    Earth Systems Earth systems are fundamental to our understanding of Earth and environmental sciences. ESCI 20000 investigates the complex interactions of earth’s spheres: atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, anthroposphere. Emphasis on cycles (hydrologic cycle, rock cycle), feedback loops (ice-albedo), and chaotic and fractal behavior within Earth systems (extinction, climate events). Study of the methods and principles employed in deciphering Earth history. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course ; ESCI-20000L Annually. Fall and Spring. [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 20500 - Earth Materials

    Course Credit: 1.25
    (ARCH)
    EARTH MATERIALS Our global society relies on minerals, rocks, and soil for life, agriculture, and industry. This course introduces the ways that we characterize and study Earth materials. The processes that control the formation and evolution of Earth materials in different tectonic and environmental settings provide the framework for learning how to analyze physical, optical, and chemical properties. Economic importance and potential health hazards will also be explored. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab weekly. (1.25 course credits) Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course; ESCI-20500L Annually. Fall and Spring. [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 21500 - Paleoecology

    Course Credit: 1.25
    Paleoecology ESCI 21500 is a lab course introducing concepts of paleoecology, the ecology of the prehistoric past. Paleoecology employs concepts of geology and biology to investigate the distribution of fossils through geological time, concentrating on ecological controls such as climate change, biogeochemistry, symbiosis, and evolution. Paleoecology is done at a range of scales from local communities to biotic realms, and from abrupt events through long-term evolutionary changes. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) or BIOL course; ESCI-21500L Annually. Fall and Spring. [MNS, W]
  
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    ESCI 22000 - Invertebrate Paleontology

    Course Credit: 1.25
    Invertebrate Paleontology Paleontology is the study of ancient life, and invertebrates are protists and animals without backbones. This course is an exploration of the invertebrate fossil record with an emphasis on how these fossils are critical for understanding evolution, geologic time, and ancient environments. Techniques covered in this course include fossil identification, field collecting, specimen preparation, and paleoecological interpretation. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Fieldtrips required. (1.25 course credits) Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course, or BIOL-20200; ESCI-22000L Annually. Fall and Spring. [MNS, W]
  
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    ESCI 25000 - Intro to Geographic Info Systems (GIS)

    Course Credit: 1
    (ARCH, ENVS)
    Introduction to Geographic Information Systems A lab-intensive introduction to the basic concepts in computer-based GIS. Students will learn how acquire, design, read, and analyze spatial data in order to solve problems in a variety of disciplines, with emphasis on the natural and environmental sciences. They will also learn basic principles of cartography (map-making) and data presentation. The primary platform used will be ArcMap by ESRI and Microsoft Excel, but the techniques learned are applicable to other software packages. Three hours of lecture weekly. [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 27000 - Paleoclimate

    Course Credit: 1.25
    (ARCH)
    Paleoclimate The study of past climate change is an environmental science that can help interpret the past, explain the present, and anticipate future change and climate impacts. After an overview of Earth’s ocean-atmosphere system and energy balance, we will explore the Quaternary (last 2 million years) focusing on dating methods and techniques of reconstructing past climates through field and lab projects. Labs include computer modeling, analysis of time series and field projects extracting lake sediment cores and collecting and processing tree-ring data. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Fieldtrips required. Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course; ESCI-27000L [MNS, Q]
  
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    ESCI 27500 - Modern Climate Change

    Course Credit: 1
    (ENVS)
    Modern Climate Change Climate change is one of the greatest global and environmental issues of our time. This environmental science course begins with a deep look at the physical science behind modern climate change, from Earth’s energy balance, to ocean and atmospheric circulation, to the carbon cycle. Real climate data from weather stations and remote sensing instruments are examined, as are climate projections from modern climate models. Includes an overview of climate change impacts and the inherent environmental injustice therein. The history of climate change policy and mitigation will also be considered, especially efforts through the UN. Three hours of lecture weekly. Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 28000 - Hydrology

    Course Credit: 1.25
    (ENVS)
    Hydrology Hydrology is the geological and environmental science that examines how water cycles through various Earth systems, including atmospheric water vapor, river discharge, seasonal snowpack, and groundwater. Students will perform quantitative analysis of real hydrological data and apply physical principles in hydrology to problems in water resources. Topics covered include the calculation of river discharge and flood frequency, watershed analysis, groundwater recharge, western US water laws, and the impacts of climate change on water resources. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course; ESCI-28000L [MNS, Q]
  
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    ESCI 29901 - Statistics for Earth Scientists

    Course Credit: 1.25
    Statistics for Earth Scientists Earth and environmental scientists use a variety of statistical methods to study the interrelated parts of Earth’s system, from comparing the chemical composition of two rock samples, to calibrating satellite sensors, to projecting climate change impacts. In this course, students will apply a combination of core statistical tools, e.g.,tests of difference, correlation, and linear regression) and advanced techniques (e.g., time series analysis, interpolation, and principal components analysis), to real spatial and temporal data. Students will also learn to use the open-source statistical computing language R. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course; ESCI-29901L [MNS, Q]
  
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    ESCI 33000 - Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology

    Course Credit: 1.25
    (ARCH)
    Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology Igneous and metamorphic processes govern the rock cycle, from the formation of rocks at mid-ocean ridges, through subduction, collision, and continental rifting. Petrologic concepts help us understand the Earth system and societally relevant issues, like natural hazards and resources. This course uses fundamental physical and chemical concepts to analyze the formation and evolution of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Topics include classification and description, structures, phase diagrams, and thermodynamics. Emphasis on optical, petrographic, geochemical methods. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite(s): ESCI-20500 (or GEOL-20800); ESCI-33000L [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 33500 - Geochemistry

    Course Credit: 1.25
    Geochemistry Geochemistry explores the chemical interactions between and among Earth’s spheres, including the chemistry of the physical environment and anthropogenic impacts. Topics include crystal chemistry, magmatic evolution, isotope systems and their applications, and chemistry of the hydrosphere. Geochemical methods include x-rays, electron beam, and mass spectroscopy. Global geochemical data management is also considered. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab weekly. Prerequisite(s): ESCI-20500 (or GEOL-20800); ESCI-33500L [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 34000 - Structural Geology

    Course Credit: 1.25
    Structural Geology Mountain belts are some of the more majestic and scenic landforms on Earth, and they are archives into Earth’s history. GEOL 34000 focuses on the processes and geometry of deformed rocks by examining structures from the mesoscopic to the microscopic scale. Emphasis on fundamental principles, analysis methods, and field/lab-based techniques to solve real-world problems. Understanding structural deformation on Earth is important for many fields, including environmental pollution, the movement of groundwater, the location of economic resources. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite(s): ESCI-20000 (or GEOL-20000); ESCI-34000L [MNS, Q]
  
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    ESCI 34500 - Tectonics and Basin Analysis

    Course Credit: 1.25
    Tectonics and Basin Analysis An examination of the processes responsible for the formation and evolution of tectono-sedimentary basins in order to understand the interplay of tectonic, climatic, and eustatic controls on subsidence mechanisms and sediment accumulation history. Selected tectonic settings and diverse basin types from different geologic time periods will be emphasized. Various petrographic, sedimentologic, stratigraphic, structural, and geophysical data sets will be used in order to model and to analyze basin histories. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite(s): ESCI-20000 (or GEOL-20000); ESCI-34500L [MNS, Q]
  
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    ESCI 35000 - Studies in Earth Sciences

    Course Credit: 1
    Studies in Earth Sciences To allow students with significant ESCI background to explore interdisciplinary topics in further detail. Planetary Geology, Geophysics, Desert Geology, Geology of Oil and Gas and others offered when sufficient student interest is shown. Prerequisite(s): ESCI-20000 (or GEOL-20000) [W]
  
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    ESCI 37000 - Sedimentology & Stratigraphy

    Course Credit: 1.25
    (ARCH)
    Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Sedimentary rocks are formed on the Earth’s surface and thus record the complex changes in environments and climates over geologic time. Stratigraphy is the study of the distribution of these rocks. This course explores the origin of sedimentary rocks with an emphasis on their paleoenvironmental and economic value. Techniques covered include rock identification, petrographic analysis, depositional interpretation, and field studies. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Fieldtrips. Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course [MNS, W]
  
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    ESCI 37500 - Geomorphology

    Course Credit: 1.25
    (ARCH)
    Geomorphology Geomorphology is the study of the Earth’s surface; it is an integrative sub-discipline that examines forces and fluxes and the history and evolution of landscapes, through changes in weathering, climate, tectonism, structure, lithology, fluids, volcanism, environmental, and human modifications. Labs are field-intensive and emphasize the glacial, fluvial and built landscapes of Northeast Ohio. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Fieldtrips required. Prerequisite(s): 1 100-level ESCI (or GEOL) course; ESCI-37500L [MNS]
  
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    ESCI 39901 - Remote Sensing of Environment

    Course Credit: 1.25
    Remote Sensing of Environment This environmental science course provides students with a theoretical and practical background in remote sensing, data analysis, and environmental application. Students will explore the physical underpinnings of remote sensing systems, available datasets and acquisition techniques, analysis skills, and practical applications. Modules will include topics such as aerial and satellite imaging, thermal imaging, microwave remote sensing, lidar, and global monitoring systems. Students will learn ArcGIS and Python to analyze environmental applications such as urban growth and planning, vegetation assessment, sea surface temperature estimation, archaeological site mapping, and management of large datasets. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite(s): ESCI-25000 (or GEOL-22000); ESCI-39901L [MNS, Q]
  
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    ESCI 40000 - Tutorial

    Course Credit: 0.5
    Maximum Credit: 1
    Tutorial Advanced library, field, and laboratory research problems in Geology and Environmental Geosciences.
  
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    ESCI 40100 - Junior Independent Study

    Course Credit: 1
    Junior Independent Study Concepts and techniques of Geology and Environmental Geosciences research culminating in a Junior I.S. thesis project. Prerequisite(s): ESCI-20000 (or GEOL-20000)
  
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    ESCI 41000 - Internship

    Course Credit: 0.25
    Maximum Credit: 4
    Internship A structured, usually off-campus experience, in which a student extends classroom knowledge to a work position within a community, business, or governmental organization. Student interns work and learn under the joint guidance of a host organization supervisor and a College of Wooster mentor. The student must arrange the internship in advance through the appropriate department or program. No more than six internships, and a maximum of four Wooster course credits, will count toward graduation. The form for registering for an internship and the Internship Learning Plan are available in the office of the Registrar.
  
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    ESCI 45100 - I.S. Thesis–Semester One

    Course Credit: 1
    Independent Study Thesis–Semester One An original Earth Sciences investigation is required. An oral presentation is given to the department. P Prerequisite(s): ESCI-40100 (or GEOL-40100)
  
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    ESCI 45200 - I.S. Thesis–Semester Two

    Course Credit: 1
    Independent Study Thesis–Semester Two An original Earth Sciences investigation is required. An oral presentation is given to the department. Projects result in a thesis and an oral defense. Prerequisite(s): ESCI-45100 (or GEOL-45100)